Fall 2011 Programming

October 22 – 23, 2010: Morgan Stebbins

   


The Tibetan Book of the Dead, or Bardo Thodol, is a manual or guide for the 49-day period between a person’s death and their next rebirth.  Written in Tibet in the middle ages, it describes the entities and experiences that await all of us in the bardo, or the in-between.  Many strange and scary things happen in that intermediate phase, and it is best, from the point of view of the text, to be prepared.  In fact, if one is prepared enough, the moment of death can be the most opportune time to achieve liberation.  This occurs when you can see what is happening, including the most terrifying images, as aspects of your own mind.


Jung writes that the Bardo Thodol makes “clear to the dead man the primacy of the psyche, for that is the one thing which life does not make clear to us.  We are so hemmed in by things which jostle and oppress that we never get the chance, in the midst of all these ‘given’ things, to wonder by whom they are ‘given’.  It is from this world of given things that the dead man liberates himself; and the purpose of the instructions is to help him toward this liberation.   we … learn from the very first paragraphs the that ‘giver’ of all ‘given’ things dwells within us.  This is a truth which in the face of all evidence, in the greatest things as well as in the smallest, is never known although it is often so very necessary, indeed vital, for us to know it.”  (vol 11: 514) 


Why does Jung say this is vital?  Because this exploration of the in-between has the capacity to liberate us in this life, long before the body dies.


Lecture: Our lecture will include a brief history of the Bardo Thodol and then a symbolic exploration of its other reality.  We will look at it compared to the Egyptian Book of the Dead and Jung’s own opus of the undiscovered country, The Red Book.  Finally we will ground it in our daily lives as a useful and inspirational tool that has something to say to everyone.  Fantastic images will accompany the lecture.


Workshop: Our workshop will make it clear that The Tibetan Book of the Dead is not just for the dead!  Using Jungian tools to decipher the text we will see just how and when we can act to change our patterns of behavior during the critical “bardo” or in-between phases of experience.  Our extra time will give us the opportunity to dive into the intricate and beautiful images – to purely appreciate them, to understand them a little better, and as a way to understand ourselves or our patients.  Bring your bad habits and your imagination


Morgan Stebbins, MDiv, LMSW, is a Jungian analyst in New York City, where he is Director of Training, Supervising Analyst, and faculty member of the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association, and a faculty member of the C.G. Jung Foundation.  He teaches courses comparing the findings of depth psychology with spiritual traditions worldwide, including the Kaballah, Zen Buddhism, and The Tibetan Book of the Dead.

The Tibetan Book of the Dead and Everyday Life

September 23 and 24, 2011: Jerry Ruhl

 


Lecture: Balancing Heaven and Earth


How should we balance the inner and the outer, the masculine and the feminine, the eternal and the every day?  In struggling with goals and duties, how do we also attend to the workings of destiny and the cosmos?  Utilizing a three-thousand-year-old story from India, The Ramayana, as guide, this talk explores the Eastern genius for the development of consciousness.  Each of the characters in this individuation tale represents a part of the human psyche – all of which must be dealt with during the journey of life. This story takes a very different approach to the feminine and to evil than individuation stories in the West, and provides unique insights about living through a time when cultural traditions and values seem to be breaking down. 


Workshop: Individuation, Jung, and Eastern Thought


Inner work did not begin with Jung; it has rich traditions in India and the Far East.  In this workshop we will compare Jungian ideas about individuation with Eastern traditions.  Dr. Ruhl will present practical techniques for quieting the mind’s constant chatter and talking back to dysfunctional mental patterns that keep us stuck.  Other topics will include psychological inflation versus enlightenment, the myth of meaning, and the wisdom of uncertainty and insecurity.


Jerry M. Ruhl, Ph.D., is Executive Director of the C.G. Jung Educational Center of Houston and a clinical psychologist in private practice.  He has studied spiritual practices in Japan, Bali, Thailand, Nepal, and India. With internationally known Jungian analyst Robert A. Johnson, he is the co-author of Balancing Heaven and Earth (1998), Contentment (1999), and Living Your Unlived Life (2007).  Dr. Ruhl received a master’s degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder and earned a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Pacifica Graduate Institute.  He was formerly a trustee for the C. G. Jung Society of Colorado.

Balancing Heaven and Earth

October 21-22, 2011: Morgan Stebbins

 


Lecture and Workshop: This talk entails a re-imagining of the dynamics of the anima and animus in light of modern arousal studies, gender identity theory and discourse analysis.


Jung’s theory of the anima and animus was crucial to his crowning works of Mysterium Coniunctionis  and Aion, and remains a centerpiece of thinking about lived relationship.  However the original formulation has been correctly riddled with accusations of anachronism, gender bias and linguistic naivete.  Because of these difficulties it has been either used unreflectively or abandoned, not coincidentally in a similar way to modern attitudes toward religion.  This talk re-imagines the deepest path of the animae as they lead to the self – in theory, in dreams and in lived relationship. 


Morgan Stebbins, MDiv, LMSW, is a Jungian analyst in New York City, where he is Director of Training, Supervising Analyst, and faculty member of the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association, and a faculty member of the C.G. Jung Foundation.  He teaches courses comparing the findings of depth psychology with spiritual traditions worldwide, including the Kaballah, Zen Buddhism, and The Tibetan Book of the Dead.

The Tropics of Desire: The Soul’s Expressions of Conunctio in Dreams and Life

November 11 and 12, 2011: Robert Romanyshyn

Lecture:  With his idea of the psychoid archetype Jung explored a level of the unconscious where psyche and nature are  one.  In this lecture, Dr. Romanyshyn will show  how what we have called the unconscious is at this level the conscious of nature within us. Presenting a DVD he made after returning from a journey he took to the Antarctic in Nov. 2009, Dr. Romanyshyn will describe how this journey in the outer world began with a journey in the inner world of a dream of more than 30 years ago. He will also suggest in this lecture that the format of the DVD, which presents 86 images set to music accompanied by a voice over, deepens a psychology of mind, where the inner world of psyche and the outer world of nature are separate, into an aesthetics of the heart, where the inner and the outer intersect each other. In addition Dr. Romanyshyn will also consider how psychology as an aesthetic response to nature can be the foundation for a radical ecology that attends to the crises of nature as a symptom calling us to re-member the broken connections between the world and us.


Workshop: Left by the Side of the Road — Individuation and Homecoming


This workshop explores the connection between the psychoid archetype presented in the Friday evening lecture and individuation. Beginning with that beautiful story of the rainmaker that Jung tells in Mysterium Coniunctionis, we will explore how a radical ecology that puts us in harmony with nature presumes and requires a sense of harmony within oneself.


For Jung individuation refers to those moments and occasions in one’s life when one is called to follow the law of one’s own being, to become the person one was meant to be. Such moments often occur in mid- life, but they can take place at any moment of important transitions. Anxiety most often accompanies these moments and they are also quite often expressed in dreams and symptoms. Individuation is a crisis but as such it is not only a danger, it is also an opportunity. Individuation presents each of us with the chance to transform one’s fate into a destiny.


In this workshop we will explore Jung’s theme of individuation as a process of homecoming and show how in coming home to oneself one also comes home to the world. Through music, film, story and poetry we will create a space of reverie in which we will make use of dream material, symptoms, fantasies, and writing exercises to tap into the creative unconscious in order to begin the work of transforming memory into memoir. Together we will engage in a journey whose steps include slowing down, learning to linger in the moment and adopting an attitude of hospitality that allows us to be turned back toward and to be addressed by those aspects of ourselves that have been forgotten, ignored, abandoned, left behind or otherwise sacrificed. Along this path we will engage those who wait for us with the unfinished business of our lives.


The goal of this workshop is for each participant to begin crafting a narrative of homecoming that arises within a slowness that reaches toward the stillness of a solitude that reaches toward the silence of a sorrow that reaches toward and be-comes serenity.


Robert D. Romanyshyn received his doctorate in clinical psychology from Duquesne University in 1970. After 20 years of private practice and a career as a Professor of Psychology at the University of Dallas, where he co-founded with Robert Sardello and later James Hillman the innovative graduate program in phenomenological and archetypal psychology, he accepted in 1991 the invitation to join the faculty at Pacifica Graduate Institute. A Senior Core Faculty member in the clinical psychology program at the institute he also teaches in the program in Depth Psychology with an Emphasis in Psychotherapy.

 

Psyche and Nature: Inner journeys in the Outer World

December 2 and 3, 2011: John Beebe

Lecture:  This month OFJ welcomes back John Beebe, MD.  Dr. Beebe is a past president of the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco and a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. He has lectured on topics related to analytical psychology in many parts of the world.  Most recently, Dr. Beebe has become the International Association for Analytical Psychology’s Liaison to the Developing Group of analytical psychotherapists in Shanghai.  His book Integrity in Depth has been translated into Chinese, and he is part of the project to bring out the Collected Works of C. G. Jung in a Chinese translation.  John is the founding editor of Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche, and served as the first US editor of the Journal of Analytical Psychology.   He maintains a psychotherapy practice in San Francisco.


Workshop:  The I Ching: the Imagination of Integrity


Description:  Analytical psychology, with its emphasis on intuitive images, has frequently recorded the way a particularly arresting inner image can foster healing.   Comparing the psychotherapist’s work to that of the Renaissance alchemist, similarly engaged in promoting a process of transformation, Jung was fond of quoting the hermetic maxim, “For those who have the image, the passage is easy.”    But how does a patient in psychotherapy “have” the image that has such a transformative effect on personality and behavior?  John Beebe believes the image needs to be “achieved,” a process that involves heart and mind in submitting to the contours of the image, allowing it to communicate its pattern to our minds, which must then translate the image in an authentic way to us so that we come to live inside it.   If we allow ourselves to become shaped by the image, rather than trying to shape it to our own ends, it will show us a new way to live.  In this lecture, Dr. Beebe will draw on insights and images from classical Chinese philosophy, especially Taoist and Confucian understandings of integrity, and the Book of Transformations, the I Ching, to help us see and feel the dynamic potential of this process.


John Beebe, MD is a past president of the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco and a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. He has lectured on topics related to analytical psychology in many parts of the world.  Most recently, Dr. Beebe has become the International Association for Analytical Psychology’s Liaison to the Developing Group of analytical psychotherapists in Shanghai.  His book Integrity in Depth has been translated into Chinese, and he is part of the project to bring out the Collected Works of C. G. Jung in a Chinese translation.  John is the founding editor of Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche, and served as the first US editor of the Journal of Analytical Psychology.   He maintains a psychotherapy practice in San Francisco.

Achieving the Image: Lessons from Chinese Philosophy

Coming to OFCGJ in 2012

January – Glen Slater: The God Complex
Fri., Jan. 13 – First United Methodist Church Sanctuary
Sat., Jan. 14 – First United Methodist Church Fireside Room


February – Jane Zich; Exploring the Visual Language of the Unconscious
Fri., Feb. 17 – First United Methodist Church Sanctuary
Sat., Feb. 18 – Tualatin Nature Park / Beaver Den


March – Patricia Damery; The ‘Spiritualized Earth’ and the Birth of a New Consciousness
Fri., Mar. 16 – First United Methodist Church Sanctuary
Sat., Mar. 17 – Audubon Society


April – Richard Tarnas; Our Moment In History
Fri., Apr. 20 – First United Methodist Church Sanctuary
Sat., Apr. 21 – TBD


May (Lighthearted Evening) – Paulann Petersen; The Waking Dream: Poetry’s Everyday Life,
Fri., May 18 – First United Methodist Church Collins Hall